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Published 10th June 2011

Vol 52 No 12


Sudan

Edging towards the brink

A silhouette of a person in a village just outside Juba. Photographer: Sven Torfinn
A silhouette of a person in a village just outside Juba

Image courtesy of Panos Pictures

Fears are rising at home and abroad that Khartoum’s attacks could take the South back to war as Independence dawns

As the Sudanese regime bombs the Nuba heartland and moves Missiriya people into a near empty Abyei, tension is rising across Sudan, especially along the still undemarcated North-South border and in the oil fields. On 9 June, Khartoum bombed Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) troops and civilians alike in Pariang Country, Unity State, said the Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS). With less than a month before South Sudan formally declares Independence, officials from the United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) privately talk about ‘ethnic cleansing’.


‘Fear and... fiction from Clooney’

Sudanese ministers are not used to being chased by protestors. Yet this is how Khartoum’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Ali Ahmed Kurti left London’s sedate St. James’s Square on 6 J...


Big cabinet, bigger problems

President Museveni’s post-election reshuffle is more a political balancing act than a coherent response to unrest over high prices and shortages

President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni swore in a new cabinet on 6 June that seemed to be mainly about rewarding loyalists of the National Resistance Movement (NRM) rather than addressin...



BLUE LINES
THE INSIDE VIEW

After several diplomatic pirouettes around the delicate issue of when the African Development Bank will return to its former headquarters in Abidjan, President Donald Kaberuka confirmed at the bank’s annual meeting in Lisbon on 9-10 June that it will return to Côte d’Ivoire from its temporary headquarters in Tunis ‘in the shortest possible time’. Kaberuka’s publicly stated determination on the issue follows a lengthy meeting with Côte d’Ivoire’s new President Alassane Ouattara after his inaug...

After several diplomatic pirouettes around the delicate issue of when the African Development Bank will return to its former headquarters in Abidjan, President Donald Kaberuka confirmed at the bank’s annual meeting in Lisbon on 9-10 June that it will return to Côte d’Ivoire from its temporary headquarters in Tunis ‘in the shortest possible time’. Kaberuka’s publicly stated determination on the issue follows a lengthy meeting with Côte d’Ivoire’s new President Alassane Ouattara after his inauguration at Yamoussoukro on 21 May.

On 3 June, AfDB directors approved a US$150 million loan to back the Ouattara government’s social sector and adminstrative reforms. Ouattara, who wants to re-establish Abidjan as a leading financial centre in West Africa, will be heartened by AfDB’s new commitment. Within days of coming to power in April he re-established operations of the Banque Centrale des États de l’Afrique de l’Ouest in Abidjan and has grand plans for the redevelopment of the regional stock exchange launched there in the mid-1990s.

AfDB directors had wanted to wait another three years after Ouattara’s accession to power before making a clear commitment to return, but lobbying by the Ivorian leader’s allies among bank shareholders seems to have won through. Before it returns, the bank may have to build an entirely new headquarters perhaps in Cocody district away from its former location in the Plateau district which was badly battered by the war.

Read more

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Pointers

Trial by procrastination

Due to open on 1 June, the long-awaited Avid Investment Corporation trial, involving claims over the embezzlement of 30 million Namibian dollars (US$4.3 mn.), has been postponed ye...


Malema and Zuma for breakfast

The African National Congress Youth League’s 24th annual conference convenes on 16 June with a new feature, the ‘Business Networking Lounge’. Under the rubric of ‘Youth Action For ...


Khartoum’s debt threat

The Khartoum regime will face growing financial pressure after the formal split with the South on 9 July. That is partly why its Finance Minister, Ali Mahmoud Abdel Rasul, chose to...