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Published 1st December 2006

Vol 47 No 24


South Africa

Help, murder, police!

Image courtesy of Panos Pictures

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The investigation of a fraudster's murder raises doubts about the national police chief's position

President Thabo Mbeki and Safety and Security Minister Charles Nqakula are so far standing by National Police Commissioner Jackie Selebi, who is at the centre of a bizarre political-criminal scandal. It began when Brett Kebble, a mining magnate and fraudster, who has been bankrolling the defence of the sacked Deputy President, Jacob Zuma, was shot dead in his car on 27 September last year. Kebble has been linked to the theft of millions of mining company shares. On 16 November the Scorpions, the investigative arm of the National Prosecutions Authority, arrested Selebi's friend Glen Agliotti in connection with the murder. They are now investigating Selebi himself, who insists he has done no wrong and was unaware of any criminal activity by Agliotti.


La grande rupture

A French judge warms up some old allegations and creates a diplomatic storm

The break in diplomatic relations between Paris and Kigali will not heal quickly. It came after France's Judge Jean-Louis Bruguière asked a higher court to issue internation...


Retaliatory justice

If Judge Jean-Louis Bruguière obtains the international warrants issued in France, nine people will be targets for arrest if they enter the European Union and other countrie...



BLUE LINES
THE INSIDE VIEW

Khartoum is at the epicentre of the growing regional crisis in the Horn of Africa, which is spreading into Central Africa. As UN and African Union officials at the talks in Addis Ababa pressed Sudan to agree to a UN peacekeeping mission in Darfur, President Omer el Beshir’s troops were stepping up their joint offensive with Janjaweed militias in northern Darfur and coordinating support for rebel forces in Chad and Central African Republic. Then on 29 November, news broke that Khartoum-backed ...
Khartoum is at the epicentre of the growing regional crisis in the Horn of Africa, which is spreading into Central Africa. As UN and African Union officials at the talks in Addis Ababa pressed Sudan to agree to a UN peacekeeping mission in Darfur, President Omer el Beshir’s troops were stepping up their joint offensive with Janjaweed militias in northern Darfur and coordinating support for rebel forces in Chad and Central African Republic. Then on 29 November, news broke that Khartoum-backed militias were fighting with Sudan People’s Liberation Army forces in Malakal, southern Sudan. Yet Khartoum’s Islamist regime maintains broad support from its Egyptian and Libyan neighbours and so worsens the north-south divide in the AU. Somalia, where the Supreme Islamic Courts Council is at war with the Transitional Federal Government, also links to Khartoum. Many of the SICC militants were trained in Sudan, when the Khartoum regime hosted Usama bin Laden and styled itself as the headquarters of Islamist International. Although US Assistant Secretary of State for Africa Jendayi Frazer says she spends 80% of her time on Sudan and Somalia, Western states seem further than ever from having an effective policy in the Horn.
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No win, no gain

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Sudan targets Chad

Chadian rebels launch a new offensive against President Déby after fresh backing from the Sudan government

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Investigation down under

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Voters and protestors start to register

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The Darfur deadline passes

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The President speaks

Bingu wa Mutharika puts his case: the IMF approves, politics are turbulent and the anti-corruption trials hang fire

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Pointers

Atiku again

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Grafters' gridlock

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Resolution riddles

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